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The International Qiantang River Tidal Bore Festival

Haining is located in the north of Zhejiang Province, facing the Qiantang River in the south. The Qiantang River looks like a trumpet at its mouth, while flowing east towards Hangzhou Bay. The world-famous Qiantang Tidal Bore, or the Haining tide, created by the gravity from the moon and the rotation of the Earth, has been hailed as "marvelous spectacle". The Qiantang Tidal Bore is believed to be one of the three biggest tides in the world and can be viewed every month. The biggest and most impressive tidal bore usually happens in September when tens of thousands of visitors flood into Haining to catch a glimpse of the world-famous annual event.


Qiantang River Tidal Bore


The Qiantang Tidal Bore is a marvelous natural phenomenon known domestically and internationally. It is a tradition for people living around the Qiantang River to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival by eating moon-cakes and enjoying the sight of the tide. Haining is traditionally deemed as the best place to watch the marvel, since it offers the best view of the tide water rapidly rising and surging.


Qiantang River Tidal Bore

 
The Qiantang River tide appears on the eighth month of the Chinese lunar calendar, and the highest tidal waves can be seen on the 18th day of the eighth month of the Chinese Lunar calendar every year. The International Qiantang River Tidal Bore Festival has been held annually since 1994.

Qiantang Tidal Bore



Since the shape of Hangzhou Bay looks like a trumpet, the water coming in from the Pacific Ocean forms three major types of waves, the ‘yi xian chao’ (一线潮), literally ‘a ribbon of tide’ in Chinese at Haining; ‘jiao cha chao’ (交叉潮), ‘the crisscrossing tide’ at the Great Gap; and ‘hui tou chao’ (回头潮), ‘the whipping-around tide’ at Lao Yan Cang. The tide can roll in as high as a huge wall, reaching at an average of 3.5 meters, and at its highest is 8.9 meters.